Slides from Hacking OWASP Top 10 – Infinity Stones + Walkthrough at Blacks in Cybersecurity

On Friday February 5, 2021, I provided a training on teaching Application Security concepts using the OWASP Top 10.

The Open Web Application Security Project or OWASP is a non-profit organization whose mission is to make application security better. Members of OWASP meet every few years to create a top 10 list of the prevalent vulnerabilities in the industry. The last list was from 2017.

The structure of my training is the first part is to present the theoretical part – concepts and definitions. The last part of the training is a practical or application of the first part of the training (theoretical).

For the practical piece I used the website – BodgeIt Store. The BodgeIt Store is an insecure app, that should NOT be deployed in commercial servers. Many will say that the BodgeIt Store is a SUPER old insecure app (it’s close to 10 years old).

The app is close to 10 years old, but I find this app is good to teach application security as there’s a scoreboard and 12 challenges to complete.

Anyway, without further ado below are my slides from my training

I also provided documents that provide a walkthrough of the BodgeIt store as well as installing and using an interception proxy such as Burp Suite.

Finally, I included instructions on how to import the OWASP Broken Authentication VM which have a series of insecure apps.

See below.

Enjoy and keep hacking!

Slides from – Is Your App Safe? Reverse Engineering An Android App Training + Walkthrough from Blacks in Cybersecurity Winter Conference

During the weekend I participated as a speaker at the Blacks in Cybersecurity Winter Conference. This conference was online, and was a GREAT experience. I learned a lot of information and was able to meet with a lot of people and recruiters.

Anyway, my training today (Saturday February 6, 2021) was on reversing an Android application. In my training I talked about how apps are not safe by showing case studies (as recent as last week!) along with describing the components of an Android app. Next, I talked about how to reverse an Android app and how to do dynamic analysis using Frida. I finished the course by having a lab where I put all of the pieces together with the UnCrackable-Level1.apk.

Note – The virtual machine we’re using for this training is one that I created. The VM is titled, IntroToAndroidSecurity version 1.1.2. This VM has the common tools for Android Hacking in one place. I also included insecure Android apps in the virtual machine as well for participants to continue their learning/growth in mobile security. For the training I also used an Android emulator (Androidx86). I did this as I wanted all the participants to be on the same playing field. If we were doing mobile security as a job, we would want to have a real physical device.

Without further ado – here are my slides from the training.

Also, if you want to download the virtual machines (IntroToAndroidSecurity and Androidx86) from my training go to my Source Forge link here.

Note – Click on the External Links tab to get the VMs.

I am also including the documents I created for this training as well –

To set up the mobile lab, you will need the first two documents. I included the third document just in case the second document (importing Androidx86) does not work.

Document 4 is the walkthrough of the lab that I completed during the training.